Watch Service: Omega Deville. Cal 565.

Omega Deville service

The second watch of the duo sent in by Matt, the classic vintage Omega Deville. Its actually very similar to the Omega 613 calibre that I posted a few weeks ago, the difference being that the 565 here, is the automatic version. Both feature a date with quick date setting.

This watch is another to feature the ‘monocoque’ case – meaning the case is all one piece, with no case back to remove the movement through that is found in the majority of watches. Instead here, the stem is a split stem design, if pulled hard enough, the outer part of the stem detaches from the inner part. This enables the movement to be removed through the front of the case once the glass has been removed. They are always a little more difficult to work on, this is due to the fact any adjustments that need to be made after the movement is serviced cannot be done by simply removing the case back, instead the whole movement needs to be removed, making it more time consuming.

So my first task is to remove the outer part of the stem and glass so that I can access the movement. Glass removed below, the outer stem will be next. Another complication is how the movement is secured, to release the case clamps, the movement has to be twisted anti-clockwise to align the clamps with gaps in the case allowing it to drop out. The only way to do this is pushing on the dial – a task that must be performed very carefully if you dont want to redesign the dial with a nice scratch across it!

Omega Deville service

Movement out and dial removed. Its a movement that is certainly in nice condition. The biggest risk to these vintage watches is actually other watchmakers, of the unskilled variety.

Omega Deville service

Dial side disassembled as far as the keyless works.

Omega Deville service

The other side of the movement is in equally nice condition, I see these vintage omega movements in a wide variety of states, this one is certainly one of the better ones.

Omega Deville service

I begin disassembly with the crown wheel and ratchet wheel (I have already removed and taken apart the automatic device.)

Omega vintage service

I continue on, just the pallets and pallet bridge remaining this side.

Omega vintage service

Movement completely stripped, each part individually checked for damage or wear, and now its ready for a cycle through the cleaning machine.

Omega vintage service

The first part I refit and oil once cleaning has been completed is the keyless works.

Omega vintage service

Next I fit the barrel and barrel bridge.

Omega vintage service

Closely followed by the train and train bridge.

Omega vintage service

I refit the crown wheel, ratchet wheel and balance. At this point the watch begins to run and Ill oil the train wheel jewels and the escapement. A very nice example of a 565 calibre.

Omega 565 service

Before fitting the auto, I replace the rotor axle. The old one was worn, casing the automatic rotor to have too much play in it, this could cause problems with the auto winding. In the picture the new one is on the right and yet to be fitted.

Omega 565 service

Refitted back in its case, Ill check the performance on the timing machine at the very last point before fitting the glass, this lowers the chance of needing to remove the glass once fitted to make adjustments to the movement.

Omega 565 service

The completed watch with a brand new Omega plexi glass fitted.

Omega 565 service

The watch must then pass various tests over a number of days before being returned to the owner.

As always, thanks for reading.

The Watch Professional

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